Year C Advent 4 Luke 1 2012


Live the Lullaby
Luke 1:39-45, (46-55)

Every baby will keep every parent up all night, at least once. It's a rule. Whether because they are teething or colicky, anxious or tummy-troubled, or just plain fussy, it's part of a baby's mission in life to keep its parents awake weeping and wailing.

We parents are "hard-wired" to respond to an infant's cries. What has kept us grieving all week, a grief that can't be spoken? What has kept our hearts hurting all week, a pain that won't go away? When an infant or child is in trouble, or hurt, or killed, both our right and left brains insist we must do something to "fix" the situation. If our hearts melt at the mere sound of a distressed infant, how much more do our hearts overflow in anguish at the sight of children being harmed or in harm's way – even if our own nerve endings are jangling and cross-firing.

Before there were "white noise" recordings, washing machines, or long car rides to soothe the plaintive cries of a child, parents in every culture on the planet came up with the same plan to quiet a crying child — lullabies. Sweet melodies, slowly cadenced, softly sung, lullabies "lull" little ones into a dreamy place. They also have almost lulled me to my doom. One of my favorite CDs is Tom Wasinger's "The World Sings Goodnight," which I have downloaded into the playlist of my truck. These 33 lullabies are from all over the world - Bolivia, Indonesia, Poland, Russia, Ethiopia, Japan, Egypt, India, Algeria, Iran, to name a few other than the more obvious ones from the US and Canada. My problem is that as I'm barreling down the highway listening to these lullabies, I'm also being lulled to sleep...

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